Irvington Home Tour Showcases Design Innovation & Hilarious History

By Nick Krautter | Market Reports

Irvington Home Tour Showcases Design Innovation & Hilarious History

May 11, 2017
Irvington Home Tour

Annual Irvington Home Tour May 21st

Get Tickets Here

Are you a history-minded house hunter? Interested in seeing how historic dwellings can evolve to fit modern needs? You definitely want to be in attendance for the 35th annual Irvington Home Tour on May 21, where some of the neighborhood’s most intriguing examples of architecture and design will be showcased for a good cause.

“This tour is not just for antique hounds and old-house lovers,” said Home Tour head Brian Schaeperkoetter to the Oregonian’s Janet Eastman. “There is some amazing modern interior design in the other homes. Great examples of how these old homes can be adapted for 21st century family living.”

In her preview of the event, Eastman highlights a particularly charming anecdote about a home featured on the tour:

In the 1920s, when Prohibition outlawed alcohol, the neighborhood’s oldest Craftsman became a speakeasy run by bootlegger Alma Hopkins.

On Oct. 23, 1923, The Oregonian reported that neighbors, including the minister of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, complained of “high-powered cars” coming and going at all hours, all-night revels and eruptions from drunken men and women. The police raided the house, arrested “the Hopkins woman” and seized 60 quarts of choice whiskey.

The Irvington Home Tour runs from 11 AM to 5 PM on Sunday, May 21. Tickets are $25 and benefit Irvington Community Association’s Charitable Giving Program. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit IrvingtonHomeTour.com.

Photo Credit: James Heuer provided by the Irvington Home Tour

About the Author

Nick Krautter is the author of The Golden Handoff: How to Buy and Sell a Real Estate Agent’s Business which debuted number one on Amazon for mergers and acquisitions. His goal is to teach real estate agents how to grow their business and to help them later retire and benefit from their years of hard work. For the last decade Nick has been a Realtor in Portland, Oregon, where he leads a team and frequently serves as a real estate expert for the media.